E4 Obsessiveness

I was reading some of the criticism of Every Extend Extra Extreme and the bulk of it consists of: it’s too easy, too repetitive and too long. I don’t dispute that; it really is. As I was reading those I realized that for nearly the last hour I had one song playing on repeat over and over again*. When it comes to music I like I tend to be obsessive compulsive about it. If I like it, I like it…

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Every Extend Extra Extreme

That mouthful of a title is Q? Entertainment‘s latest XBox Live Arcade game, Every Extend Extra Extreme. It’s essentially a re-imagining of the PSP Every Extend Extra which was a re-working of the freeware title Every Extend, a huge favourite of mine. The PSP version was great in that it provided a nice, portable version of that favourite but I found the new additions to be lacking. I never really got into anything beyond the Classic mode. There was this…

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Montreal International Game Summit

I’ve been contemplating going to the Montreal International Game Summit at the end of November. In part because I want to participate in Kokoromi Collective’s Gamma256 competition and event but mostly because of the great speakers and sessions they have lined up. I could also stand to visit the city even if it is in the end of November, but the $500 price tag is keeping me at bay and that’s not even counting accommodation and transportation. Of course I…

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DD Price Drops

The great thing about retail games is that they take up space. They fill store shelves and warehouses with their physical selves. When the latest, greatest box (with game inside) comes out it requires room on these shelves and warehouses so that it can be stored or displayed. If there isn’t any some of the old boxes have to be removed. This is great for the consumer as it often means price reductions for clearance. With digitally distributed games space…

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SEGA Rally Revo Demo Impressions

SEGA Rally Championship was one of those very slick arcade racers by SEGA in the mid 90s in the vein of Virtua Racing and Daytona USA. Of the three, Rally was my favourite but it wasn’t the most informed of decisions: in their original arcade run, I played all three a combined dozen times (give or take a few). It’s not that I didn’t like the games — I did — it’s just that the combination of really advanced rendering…

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Super Metroid Redesign

One of the things I did when I was down in Boston is, ahem, play Super Metroid Redesign with my wonderful hosts, who have as much appreciation for the original as I do. It’s an extensive and impressive reworking of the classic game but one that goes straight for the gut of Metroid and leaves something entirely unpleasant. It takes the broad, worldwide appeal of the original title and turns it into something that appeals to about, oh, two dozen…

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Heading South

Canadian dollar vs US dollar: I’m off to the States for a few days to make use of this. Adios.

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Hulk Promises Violence

I went to see Eastern Promises a few evenings ago (it was good but A History of Violence was better) and the walk to the theatre took me right by the set for The Incredible Hulk. The stretch of Yonge Street between Gerrard and Dundas, a busy area, was closed for evenings and nights for a few days while the film’s final showdown was being filmed in faux-Harlem. You would think that in this day and age of CGI a…

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TIFF: All Hat

I went to see All Hat at the Isabel Bader Theatre on Tuesday. All Hat is a self-described “neo western” involving the horse racing scene in southern Ontario (Fort Erie, to be specific.) It stars Luke Kirby (the big shot Hollywood actor in season one of Slings and Arrows) and Keith Carradine (Wild Bill in Dead Wood) and some other people. The Isabel Bader Theatre is part of the University of Toronto and it’s a decent, if small, place for…

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On Walking Out

Walking out of a movie is like a big capital F capital U to the film maker, especially if the director is in attendance. It says “I spent time and money to be here and I’m not even going to dignify this by sticking through to the end. I’ve seen enough.” Up until yesterday I’ve never walked out on a film. Not in the last two film festivals. Not ever. It’s not that I haven’t seen some real stinkers before…

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Off Screen Action

The action on the weekend wasn’t restricted to the screens of the theatres. I came across this scene on my walk home today. Commentary provided by some local slack-jawed bystander. I have no idea what instigated this but the police swarmed in seconds. Pretty quick response time if you ask me. Later, walking through the scene I notice a considerable pool of blood on the sidewalk. And yes, the cop does kick the dude when he’s stuffed into the backseat…

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TIFF Day 3 and 4

Days three and four are a haze. The films are all blurring together into a giant katamari consisting of breakups and tears and suicides and subtitles and pointy nipples and Tony Leung’s testicles. After an early wakeup and multiple snooze alarms I cabbed my way to the Paramount Scotiabank Theatre at about a quarter to nine in the morning. A little after noon I wandered around on the quiet streets and went over to the Corned Beef House for lunch…

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TIFF Day 2

The thing that I both hate and love about the film festival is how it reinforces how little I have seen and how little I know about films. Sure, I know of Dario Argento and Hsiao-hsien Hou, but I’ve never seen their films. The film festival often provides that first impression. Exposure to some director’s latest film makes me want to seek out more from their back catalog or, in some cases, makes me want to avoid it altogether. Glory…

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